How To Pursue Your Dance Dreams

José and Aimée of Dance Teachers Academy sat down with Carolina Orlovsky and discussed how she pursued her dream of becoming a dancer.

At age 5, Carolina asked for dance lessons after watching the movie “My Fair Lady.” Her parents saw her love for movement, so they enrolled her in dance class… and she was awful.

Nobody starts off good, nobody does. I started off awful.

Most of the girls had already taken dance classes and were older than me,  so I felt very out of place. I had this abundance of… I call it boy energy. Really active jumping and running.  Kind of a daredevil.  I wanted to push my limits. I didn’t separate like girls or princesses and behave this way.  I didn’t have that association with dance.  It’s athletic, you get to move and jump and fly and roll and spin and become something outside of a normal human  and I wanted to be that.

A trip to Cuba in her senior year as a dance cultural exchange changed her life. Transformed by the people of Cuba who were rich in dancing, she auditioned and was accepted to the Alvin Ailey independent study program.  Instead of working towards a college education she moved to New York City to pursue her dream of become a professional dancer.

Watch the full interview below

 

Carolina’s Achievements

 

  • 3-Times World Professional Rhythm Vice-Champion
  • 3 Times U.S. Professional Rhythm Vice-Champion
  • 9-Times U.S. Professional Rhythm Finalist
  • World Mambo Champion
  • 2-Times U.S. Mambo Champion
  • World Professional American Rhythm Showdance Champion

Carolina’s Social Media
  

Judging at the Emerald Ball

Argentine Tango – Improvisation

Ginger Rogers once said, “When two people love each other, they don’t look at each other, they look in the same direction.” While you may not always be in love with your Argentine Tango partner (or you might!), the intimate nature of the dance resonates with this saying. To dance the Argentine Tango is not to mirror each other; instead, it is about acting and reacting. The dancers have two very different objectives, working in tandem to create the beautiful tango. Let us further explain the objectives of each dancer.

Argentine Tango is a series of improvised movements that are executed by two independent individuals. There are no basic tango steps, no checklist of steps to complete before the end of a song. A good leader must have the sense about him not only to choose the next move, but to invite his partner to make that step in a way that is clear to her. She must accept the invitation, complete the movement, then regain her balance. Once she is ready again to follow, he invites her again.

The follower may indicate that she would like to stop for a moment and add an adornment, which the leader can accept and allow her to add to the dance, or he can choose to continue in the steps that he planned next. This allows the follower to add her own flair to the dance, and perhaps give the leader a moment of stillness to design their next move. The leader must be dependable, but flexible, and wait for his follower to be ready to follow him again. The follower must be agile, adaptable, and trust the leader.

If you are new to the Argentine Tango, try listening to your partner in this way. Leaders, wait for your follower to regain her balance before you invite her to follow you again. Followers, don’t be afraid to communicate that you want to slow down and add to the dance. Your personality and how you improvise together is what makes the tango so extraordinary!